EU states do not consider fascist terror attacks on refugees and ethnic minorities to be terrorism

Little-known fact: Fascist, far-right terror attacks on refugees and ethnic minorities are increasing across Europe, but all European Union member states (excluding the Netherlands) do not officially consider these to be terrorist attacks and thus do not include them in official reports on terrorism.

Professional war hawk Anthony Cordesman noted this in passing in his August 2017 report “Trends in European Terrorism: 1970-2016” for the notoriously pro-war think tank the Center for Strategic & International Studies (CSIS).

Reviewing Europol/EU data, Cordesman wrote:

An increasing stream of violent assaults by right-wing extremist individuals and groups was noted across Europe, in particular over the past two years, targeting asylum seekers and ethnic minorities in general.

These assaults however do not generally qualify as terrorism and are therefore not included in the numbers of terrorist attacks being reported by Member States, with only one exception in 2016, reported by the Netherlands.


This outrageous double standard was highlighted in Alain Gabon’s Middle East Eye September article “How the EU conceals far-right acts of terrorism against Muslims.”

Gabon wrote:

We now have proof from Europol itself that the bulk of far-right terrorism against refugees and minorities in Europe is almost systematically and deliberately excluded from statistics.

A careful reading of the report tells us in just one paragraph, another thing that is truly flabbergasting, and confirms what has been suspected for some time: member states (with one exception, the Netherlands) do not consider “violent assaults by right-wing extremist individuals and groups […] targeting asylum seekers and ethnic minorities in general” to be terrorist acts!

They therefore do not include them in their figures, statistics, press releases and reports. The same applies to Europol, which builds on the data provided by these member states. Breathtaking.